South Fauntleroy Area - neighborhood map 18 16 19 24
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They only way to go down to Fauntleroy then was to go to Norfolk, then go west to California Avenue, then north on California to the hill down to the little triangle. Or we could go down the ravines---there were two or three of them—on the trails my mother called the “bad trail.” It was a foot path north and west from Pilgrim Street down to where it joined the trail that went west from 35th. That was down in that area they now call Fauntleroy Park. And the trail ended up right alongside the Congregational Church down there. That was a well-developed trail because there were large trees that had fallen over the ravines and they had hand rails on them, but you could slip and fall down because it was a mossy and damp environment. But that was the way I went to Fauntleroy School. Fred Schwier

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Fauntleroy Beach

Fauntleroy Beach, 1910 (SWSHS 2010.3.1)

We bought half an acre on California Avenue, south of the Fauntleroy Church. The area was quite a wilderness then, running east to 36th and Roxbury. Everything, because of the war, was rationed, like food products, leather, rubber, lumber, etc., so we were limited as to what we could build. We moved there, on the hill in 1941. A victory garden was a must, as well as a cow, chickens, rabbits, our two baby pet goats, Sugar and Cookies, and 16 turkeys. One became famous for a variety of reasons, gaining 44 pounds. He was our favorite pet. He liked his toe nails painted and would strut around showing off and making the gobble gobble gobble sound real. His name was “Gooble.” Barbara Alfers

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My sister and I took over all the chores at home, as well as did some babysitting for the Artlip family of five girls, a set of twins also. They had a small dairy farm on acreage at 26th Southwest and Roxbury. Bev and I would walk our cow from our place on California Ave to 35th Southwest and head down Roxbury Street past Ellingsen’s pigs, where Fred Meyer is now, up to Artlip’s farm and back again at 5 pm. Quite a trek with no sidewalks and a two lane road. Barbara Alfers

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White Center - 24th and Cloverdale

24th and Cloverdale, 1920 (SWSHS 2005.32.305)

You know, at one time in White Center, when Green and White started their deal out there, they used to sell you a lot and then they would furnish the lumber for you to build a house. You had to pay for it eventually, but it made it easy for them to develop the property. I knew old Green. I heard the story on White Center’s name is that Mr. Green and Mr. White flipped a coin and Mr. White won, and they named it White Center. Right. So I suppose Mr. Green got Green Station named after him. Mel Olson