Delridge - neighborhood map 14 40 49 25
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The first house that somebody would let us rent was on Myrtle Street and this area had very few houses and it was mostly lowland, where there was lots of water. The house we lived in would flood with water because it was low and it was really the creek and the city somehow had not learned or had not called it a creek [Longfellow Creek]. There weren’t many people when I first moved into the area, but later people did move in to the area. I watched, observed a lot of young families who bought some of the new houses that was placed along the creek bank and often they lost their house because when there were really hard rains, heavy rain, their property would go underwater because it was on a creek!… I loved all the water and there were animals, lot of animals around me, raccoons and foxes and so forth, and so I remained there. Sylvia Odom

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It’s that house that I was telling you about that had all the fruit trees and old man Winkle would start up the hill and he’d slow the streetcar down so the kids could pick the apples off the tree - it’s still there. I don’t know about the apple trees, it’s all a bunch of jungle now. Warren Wing

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River? Well, we used to go down and fish off of the Duwamish Bridge, down there where the old 1st Ave bridge over the Duwamish was. A lot of boats went up the river, big boats and it was commercial. It was clean. Well I’m sure it wasn’t clean, but we could eat the fish. Janet Backman

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It was on a Sunday afternoon in October 1918, after attending church in downtown Seattle, that James “Scotty&rdquo and Marie Fife boarded the Lake Burien streetcar #4 for White Center. There they thought they would find possible sites to settle with their two children, Donald, 4 and Mary, 1 ½. As they embarked from the one-track trolley at 16th and Henderson Street and headed west, they came upon McKinnon Road (later 21st Avenue SW, later Delridge Way). Recalling that day often in the years that followed, Mrs. Fife said: “As I dragged the children along the dirt roads covered with six to eight inches of dust, I hoped and prayed to myself that their father would never choose to live way out here in the country.” But that day J.W. Fife bought two 60 by 120 foot lots in the 8400 block between Thistle and Cloverdale Streets. Donald Fife