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When my grandparents moved up there, it took them two days to move from Georgetown…They got to the foot of 35th, there where the golf course is and they camped out all night. They got an early start the next day and Grandmother said that 35th was nothing but a logging road and they would go a little way and the wagon would get stuck in the mud and her and my dad and Grandad would have to unload the wagon and then pry it out and then load it up and move on maybe a couple hundred yards… It took them all day to go from Alaska St. to Myrtle St. Warren Wing

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I think that one of the things I enjoyed was learning about Camp Long here in Seattle. It was 1941 when it was dedicated. It was a WPA project, which was during the war. President Roosevelt wanted to get work for people, for jobs and that was one of the projects. We had our 65th birthday, and I just realized a couple of days ago that on November 8th is the 70th birthday, so that’s a pretty cool place. I love it there…. I love the greenspaces we have here. I used to do tot walks where I would have two and three-year olds, and we would go and sit and feel moss and tell them stories about the moss. Moss for a little child is incredible. I think I am excited about living here because of all the greenspaces. I would not survive if I had to live in the big city. Sandy Beaucage

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In the golf course, there are all these little ravines separated all throughout the golf course and we used to own them - like one was Holly’s cavern, and my brother had the swampland - that was his. In our childhood minds we imagined a little house of forest. We were forest people, and it was great playing in that. You don’t see a lot of kids go out and play outside that much and use this great imagination that you do have available to you at that age. Holly Schwald

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We lived just two blocks from the school. We’d have to come home to lunch and I recall they had a big fence around the school yard because there were cougars around there…there were bears and we used to go blackberry picking. I recall one time especially that was funny. My brother was sick and so my mother didn’t go berry picking, but we went out there with him [father] and all of a sudden we heard him yell “Run for your lives!”. We couldn’t figure out what was wrong. He had been up on the stump picking blackberries and he fell and fell on the bear. There was a bear down below and of course the bear went one way and my dad went the other and lost his gallon bucket of berries. Jessie Shepard

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The neighborhood was great because everybody knew everybody and the parents were always around because most of them, well the mothers at least, didn’t work, so it was a safe neighborhood. You know now you’re afraid to let your kids out the door, but then we’d just go anywhere… My parents came from Greece. There were a lot of Italians here, a lot of Scandinavian people here because they all kind of pertained to the fishing. They all fished and that’s how these men got their livelihood, and I remember, my godfather was a fisherman and he would go up to Alaska to fish and come back and that was what the Scandinavians did too. Olga Skinner

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These officers had prisoners and they all had a big round ball like that chained to their ankles, big ones, at least 12 inches across. They made what they called 26th Avenue and it went clear out to what they called Paul’s Farm. That was all made by the chain gang. The officers stood over these men, and they all had this big ball attached to the leg, so that’s how the street was made. Jessie Shepard

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They called it the garden community, as well as Yesler Terrace and Rainier Vista, but I think High Point always had the better stuff because it was bigger and spread out. But they called it a garden community and gave prizes out for who had the best yard, flowers, stuff like that, a long time ago. Now the new High Point has been developed so the houses look like town houses. Contrary to when I was living there, most of the people living in High Point now, that I see, are immigrants. We had very few immigrants when I was living there. Allen Stowers

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There was a big earthquake in February of 2001. I was a delivery driver at the time and I was at a stoplight in my truck--like for FedEx. I thought someone was jumping on the back of my truck cause the truck was bouncing. I looked in my mirror--we have mirrors so you can see the back--and there wasn’t anybody there and then I noticed all the streetlights were swaying, and I saw all the people run out of all the buildings at the intersection I was in. I was in Fremont, so I realized we had an earthquake, didn’t realize how big it was. Got home, and my son, Loren---he was at a preschool--and he said, ‘Dad, we had an earthquake at school today! And I said, ‘I had one at work today, too. What happens in an earthquake?’ And he said, ‘Everyone yells ‘Earthquake!’ Alan Peterson