Delridge – Additional Photos

Gilmore Gas Station on Spokane Street, before the viaduct was built.

Gilmore Gas Station on Spokane Street, before the viaduct was built. Photo was taken facing southeast, and shows in the background nearby businesses and homes in Youngstown. Taken August 13, 1930. (Seattle Dept. of Engineering, SWSHS/Log House Museum FIC2005.0018)

Cooper School students in Youngstown crossing the new pedestrian overpass bridging busy Delridge Way.

Cooper School students in Youngstown crossing the new pedestrian overpass bridging busy Delridge Way. (SWSHS/Log House Museum FIC2006.0934)

The corner of Spokane Street and Delridge Way, facing west, in 1930

The corner of Spokane Street and Delridge Way, facing west, in 1930. Shows construction of the streetcar viaduct and bulkhead to support Pigeon Hill; gas stations and fire station 36. (Seattle Department of Engineering, SWSHS/Log House Museum FIC2006.0932)

Aerial photo of the Delridge area, showing Cooper School, playfields, and surrounding housing. Circa 1975.

Aerial photo of the Delridge area, showing Cooper School, playfields, and surrounding housing. Circa 1975. (SWSHS/Log House Museum FIC2006.0923)

The locked open West Seattle bridge span with the celebration party banner clearly visible in 1984. Neighborhoods within West Seattle were greatly impacted when the bridge was hit by a freighter in 1978. It took six years to get the funds and build the current "high bridge"

The locked open West Seattle bridge span with the celebration party banner clearly visible in 1984. Neighborhoods within West Seattle were greatly impacted when the bridge was hit by a freighter in 1978. It took six years to get the funds and build the current "high bridge". (Photo by Chris Styron. SWSHS/Log House Museum 2005.32.343)

22nd Avenue SW looking south from Charlestown Place on Pigeon Hill. Pigeon Hill was so named for the abundance of pigeons that roosted there, and fed on the spilled grain of the nearby flour mill.

22nd Avenue SW looking south from Charlestown Place on Pigeon Hill. Pigeon Hill was so named for the abundance of pigeons that roosted there, and fed on the spilled grain of the nearby flour mill. (Seattle Department of Engineering. SWSHS/Log House Museum FIC2006.0936)