VIDEOS: Next up in first Friday book series: Mike Hickey and Arleen Williams of South Seattle Community College

Friday, May 2, 2014
4-6 p.m.

Next up in the “Words, Writers & West Seattle” series are authors (and South Seattle Community College instructors) Mike Hickey and Arleen Williams, who will speak about their poetry and fiction books.

Join us at this FREE series from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday, May 2, 2014, at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village. From each purchase, our organization receives 10 percent of proceeds under the Barnes & Noble Bookfair program.

 

(The above video is an edited presentation by Judy Bentley on April 4, 2014, to 30 people attending the “Words, Writers & West Seattle” series at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village. The video is contributed by Mark Jaroslaw of Avenue Productions.)

Free BoyPresenting at the most recent installment on Friday, April 4, 2014, was West Seattle Judy Bentley, who spoke about her book, Free Boy: A True Story of Slave and Master (University of Washington Press, 2013).

Bentley, who teaches at South Seattle Community College and is former board president of our historical society, coauthored Free Boy with Lorraine McConaghy, a public historian at the Museum of History and Industry in Seattle.

The book tells the story of 13-year-old slave Charles Mitchell, who escaped from Washington Territory to freedom in Canada on the West Coast’s tiny underground railroad in 1860. Mitchell was the property of James Tilton, Surveyor General of Washington Territory, and this book is a twined biography of the two, exploring issues of race, slavery, treason, and secession in Washington Territory.

 

 

Conrad Wesselhoeft discusses the creative process behind his novel ‘Adios, Nirvana’
in presentation to 20 at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village on March 7, 2014

(The above video is the complete presentation by Conrad Wesselhoeft on March 7, 2014, to 20 people attending the “Words, Writers & West Seattle” series at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village. The video is contributed by Mark Jaroslaw of Avenue Productions.)

 

Lyanda Lynn Haupt discusses how and why she wrote ‘The Urban Bestiary’
in presentation to 50 at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village on Feb. 7, 2014

(The above video is the complete presentation by Lyanda Lynn Haupt on Feb. 7, 2014, to 50 people attending the “Words, Writers & West Seattle” series at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village. The video is contributed by Mark Jaroslaw of Avenue Productions.)

 

The wonders of the birds and critters who live among us in the city were the topic of West Seattle author Lyanda Lynn Haupt, speaking about her nature book, The Urban Bestiary: Encountering the Everyday Wild (Little Brown, 2013) on Friday, Feb. 7, 2014, at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village.

The Urban Bestiary coverIn “The Urban Bestiary,” acclaimed nature writer Haupt journeys into the heart of the everyday wild, where coyotes, raccoons, chickens, hawks and humans live in closer proximity than ever before.

Haupt’s observations bring compelling new questions to light: Whose “home” is this? Where does the wild end and the city begin? And what difference does it make to us as humans living our everyday lives?Lyanda Lynn HauptC

In this wholly original blend of science, story, myth and memoir, Haupt draws readers into the secret world of the wild creatures that dwell among us in our urban neighborhoods, whether we are aware of them or not.

With beautiful illustrations and practical sidebars on everything from animal tracking to opossum removal, “The Urban Bestiary” is a lyrical book that awakens wonder, delight and respect for the urban wild, and our place within it.

 

Robert Spector discusses how he came to write his memoir ‘The Mom & Pop Store’
in book presentation to 20 at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village on Jan. 4, 2014

(The above video is the complete presentation by Robert Spector on Jan. 4, 2014, to 20 people attending the “Words, Writers & West Seattle” series at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village. The video is contributed by Mark Jaroslaw of Avenue Productions.)

 

Robert Spector mugThe Mom & Pop Store is a celebration of the history of small, independent retail and the story of how these shops thrive on attentive customer service and community support for local businesses.

The Mom & Pop Store book coverWith the backdrop of the growing “buy local” movement across the country, Spector set out to discover the state, and the state of mind, of independent retailing in America.

From a specialty soda-pop shop in Los Angeles to a florist shop in Dayton, Ohio, from a bakery in Chicago to a bookstore in Bellingham, mom-and-pop store owners share their stories, revealing the spirit and tenacity of the small business owner, dealing with frustration and defeat as well as triumph and success.

See more information on this exciting book-talk series below!

 

Nicole Hardy discusses how she came to write ‘Confessions of a Latter-day Virgin’
in book presentation to 25 at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village on Dec. 6, 2013

(The above video is the complete presentation by Nicole Hardy on Dec. 6, 2013, to 25 people attending the “Words, Writers & West Seattle” series at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village. The video is contributed by Mark Jaroslaw of Avenue Productions.)

 

The youthful journey of faith and abstinence was the topic of a presentation by West Seattle author Nicole Hardy at the Dec. 6, 2013, installment of “Words, Writers & West Seattle.”

Nicole Hardy discusses "Confessions of a Latter-day Virgin" Dec. 6, 2013, at "Words, Writers & West Seattle."

Nicole Hardy discusses “Confessions of a Latter-day Virgin” Dec. 6, 2013, at “Words, Writers & West Seattle.”

Hardy spoke to an audience of about 25 about her memoir Confessions of a Latter-day Virgin (Hyperion, 2013) at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village.

Those attending the Dec. 6, 2013, installment of "Words, Writers & West Seattle" line up for books to be signed by author Nicole Hardy.

Those attending the Dec. 6, 2013, installment of “Words, Writers & West Seattle” line up for books to be signed by author Nicole Hardy.

When Hardy’s eye-opening “Modern Love” column appeared in The New York Times, the response from readers was overwhelming. Hardy’s essay, which exposed the conflict between being true to herself as a woman and remaining true to her Mormon faith, struck a chord with women coast-to-coast.

Now in her funny, intimate, and thoughtful memoir,  Hardy explores how she came, at the age of thirty-five, to a crossroads regarding her faith and her identity. During her childhood and throughout her 20s, Hardy held absolute conviction in her faith. But as she aged out of the church’s “singles ward” and entered her 30s, she struggled to merge the life she envisioned for herself with the Mormon ideal of homemaker, wife and mother.Confessions

Confessions of a Latter-day Virgin chronicles the extraordinary lengths Hardy went to in an attempt to reconcile her human needs with her spiritual life — flying across the country for dates with Mormon men, taking up salsa dancing as a source for physical contact, even moving to Grand Cayman, where the ocean and scuba diving provided some solace. But neither secular pursuits nor church guidance could help Hardy prepare for the dilemma she would eventually face: a crisis of faith that caused her to question everything she’d grown up believing.

In the tradition of the memoirs Devotion and Mennonite in a Little Black Dress, Confessions of a Latter-day Virgin is a mesmerizing and wholly relatable account of one woman’s hard-won mission to find love, acceptance and happiness – on her own terms.

 

Peter Stekel unravels World War II mystery in ‘Final Flight’
presentation at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village on Nov. 1, 2013

(This video consists of the full presentation of West Seattle author Peter Stekel on Nov. 1, 2013, for the Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s “Words, Writers & West Seattle” series at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village. Video contributed by Mark Jaroslaw of Avenue Productions.)

 

The thrilling solution to a 70-year mystery was the topic of a presentation by West Seattle author Peter Stekel at the Nov. 1, 2013, installment of “Words, Writers & West Seattle.”

Stekel spoke to an audience of 25 about the story behind Final Flight: The Mystery of a World War II Plane Crash and the Frozen Airmen in the High Sierra.Final Flight cover Stekel

His history/mystery book was triggered when, in October 2005, two mountaineers climbing above Mendel Glacier in the High Sierra found the mummified remains of a man in a World War II uniform, entombed in the ice. The “Frozen Airman” discovery created a media storm and a mystery that Stekel chose to investigate. What did happen to the four men who perished in 1942 on a routine navigation training flight, 150 miles off-course from its reported destination?

 

The author found bad weather, bad luck and bad timing. He also came upon empty graves, botched records and misguided recovery efforts. Then, in 2007, the unimaginable happened again. Stekel himself discovered a second body in the glacier. Another young man would finally be coming home.

Through meticulous research, interviews, and mountaineering trips to the site, Stekel uncovered the story of these four young men. Final Flight explores their ill-fated trip and the misinformation surrounding it for more than 60 years.

The book is a gripping account that’s part mystery, part history and part personal journey to uncover the truth of what happened more than 70 years ago on Nov. 18, 1942. In the process Stekel narrates the young aviators’ last days and takes us on their final flight.

 

Admiral neighborhood’s Stephanie Guerra gets free monthly sessions
featuring West Seattle authors and books off to ‘Not Crazy’ start

(This video consists of the full presentation of West Seattle author Stephanie Guerra on Oct. 4, 2013, for the Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s “Words, Writers & West Seattle” series at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village.)

 

Stephanie Guerra, author of "Billy the Kid Is Not Crazy."

Stephanie Guerra, author of “Billy the Kid Is Not Crazy.”

With funny and poignant excerpts from her brand new young-adult novel, Billy the Kid Is Not Crazy, Admiral neighborhood resident Stephanie Guerra got our “Words, Writers & West Seattle” series at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village off to a great start on Oct. 4, 2013.

Stephanie Guerra signs books after her presentation.

Stephanie Guerra signs books after her presentation.

Stephanie Guerra reads to a capacity audience from "Billy the Kid Is Not Crazy."

Stephanie Guerra reads to a capacity audience from “Billy the Kid Is Not Crazy.”

The 10-year-old protagonist, Billy, is a master at getting in trouble, but his quest to find his place in the world is a story that is inspiring.

At the Oct. 4 launch, Guerra captivated an audience of 15 who filled all available seats.

It also was special because this installment was the actual launch of Guerra’s book. She had not seen finished copies of the book until she arrived at the event, and she was thrilled.

Billy the Kid is both charming and hilarious, in the voice of Billy, who lives in West Seattle, and there are West Seattle references throughout. Plus, it has great cartoon illustrations drawn from Billy’s point of view. The audience was rapt, which might seem a surprise given that it is written for a pre-teen, middle-school audience, but it proved the truism that everyone likes to hear a good story. She also discussed her first young-adult novel, Torn, released in 2012.

The minds of middle-schoolers are familiar territory for Guerra, who teaches children’s literature and writing at Seattle University and creative writing at King County Juvenile Detention Center. She also researches and speaks out about literacy instruction for at-risk teens.

Many of those attending bought copies of Billy the Kid Is Not Crazy and Torn, which was great because from each purchase our organization received 10 percent under the Barnes & Noble Bookfair program. Stephanie graciously wrote inscriptions and had many one-on-one conversations with attendees. She also signed other copies of the books in stock at Barnes & Noble, and they are for sale there.

The series is ongoing (see below), and we are looking for other West Seattle authors who might want to participate this series.  Further information can be obtained by calling Dora-Faye Hendricks, “Words, Writers and West Seattle” chair, by phone at 206-280-9983 or by e-mail.

How great is it that West Seattle will have its own book series with its own authors and that we all will be able to easily remember that it happens on the first Friday of each month?

 

Project slates free monthly sessions featuring West Seattle
authors and books at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village

Local authors are participating in a new “book talk” series about their published books at a free monthly series, “Words, Writers & West Seattle.”

This project of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society is presented the first Friday of each month in conjunction with Barnes & Noble Westwood Village.WW&WS logo

“This is a great way for West Seattleites to get to know authors from their neighborhood,” says Clay Eals, executive director of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society. “The series offers a variety of genres, reflecting many ways to tell stories, and it’s a perfect fit for us because eliciting, preserving and passing along stories is fundamental to our mission.”

At 4 p.m. on the first Friday of each month, Barnes & Noble Westwood Village is hosting a presentation by a West Seattle-based author on a recently released book or books, plus a time for questions and answers. Each session will end at 6 p.m. (Starting in June 2014, the sessions will run from 5 to 7 p.m.

Barnes & Noble Westwood Village will have books available for sale at each session. Ten percent of the proceeds from book purchases associated with “Words, Writers & West Seattle” go to the Southwest Seattle Historical Society through the Bookfair program of Barnes & Noble.Barnes & Noble logo

Information on future presentations is available on the list below. Further information can be obtained by calling Dora-Faye Hendricks, “Words, Writers and West Seattle” chair, by phone at 206-280-9983 or by e-mail.

 

The slate for ‘Words, Writers & West Seattle’:

All sessions run from 4 to 6 p.m. the first Friday of each month at Barnes & Noble Westwood Village. Further information can be obtained by calling Dora-Faye Hendricks, “Words, Writers and West Seattle” chair, by phone at 206-280-9983 or by e-mail.

Friday, May 4, 2014 Mike Hickey and Arleen Williams of South Seattle Community College, genres: poetry, fiction

Friday, June 6, 2014 Brenda Peterson, The Drowning World (Delphinius, 2013-14), genre: young adult

Friday, July 11, 2014 Harold Taw, Adventures of the Karaoke King (Lake Union Publishing, 2011), genre: adult fiction

Friday, Aug. 1, 2014, Dan Raley, The Brandon Roy Story (Old Seattle Press, 2013), genre: sports; Pitchers of Beer (University of Nebraska Press, 2011), genre: sports; Tideflats to Tomorrow (Fairgreens Publishing, 2010), genre: history

Friday, Sept. 5, 2014, Molly Ringle, Persephone’s Orchard (Central Avenue Publishing, 2012), genre: young adult

Friday, Oct. 3, 2014, Susan Rich, Cloud Pharmacy (White Line Press, 2014), genre: poetry

 

Already presented:

Friday, Oct. 4, 2013 Stephanie Guerra, Billy the Kid Is Not Crazy (Two Lions, 2013) and Torn (Marshall Cavendish, 2012), genre: young adult

Friday, Nov. 1, 2013 Peter Stekel, Final Flight, The Mystery of a World War II Plane Crash and the Frozen Airmen in the High Sierra (Wilderness Press, 2010), genre: history

Friday, Dec. 6, 2013 Nicole Hardy, Confessions of a Latter-Day Virgin (Hyperion, 2013), genre: memoir

Friday, Jan. 3, 2014 Robert Spector, The Mom & Pop Store: True Stories from the Heart of America (Walker Books, 2009), genre: memoir

Friday, Feb. 7, 2014 Lyanda Lynn Haupt, The Urban Bestiary: Encountering the Everyday Wild (Little Brown, 2013), genre: nature

Friday, March 7, 2014 Conrad Wesselhoeft, Adios, Nirvana (Mifflin Harcourt, 2010), genre: young adult

Friday, April 4, 2014 Judy Bentley, Free Boy: A True Story of Slave and Master (University of Washington Press, 2013), genre: creative nonfiction