Promotional poster of folksinger Ivar Haglund, with sheet music for his "The Old Settler," featuring the "Acres of Clams" chorus. Audio recordings emanate from vintage radio contributed by Bob Carney.

Promotional poster of folksinger Ivar Haglund, with sheet music for his “The Old Settler,” featuring the “Acres of Clams” chorus. Audio recordings emanate from vintage radio contributed by Bob Carney.

Our “Birthplace of Seattle” Log House Museum is grateful to host our latest exhibit, on loan from the Nordic Heritage Museum, called “Keep Clam and Carry On: The Ivar Haglund Story.” It is supplemented by materials from the Ivar’s corporation.

The official grand opening of the exhibit was Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016, the day of photo historian and biographer Paul Dorpat’s presentation on Haglund at the West Seattle Library.

Display panels tell the story of Ivar Haglund.

Display panels tell the story of Ivar Haglund.

Haglund (1905-1985), is a West Seattle native and the grandson of Hans Hanson, who for many years posted a lantern at Alki Point that predated the 1913 construction of the Alki Lighthouse.

Haglund’s maternal grandparents purchased the Alki Point land in 1869 from Seattle pioneer David “Doc” Maynard.

The exhibit — which opened informally in December 2015 and will be up through the spring — features display panels, vintage TV footage and radio shows and unusual artifacts, from a “clam gun” to one of the clam outfits used to promote Ivar’s restaurants in Seattle parades and commercials.

To see the exhibit, stop in during our regular open hours, noon to 4 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays. And to see video of the Feb. 7, 2016, presentation by Paul Dorpat on Ivar Haglund at the West Seattle Library, click here.

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